10 Ways to Be a Man of Integrity

great stuff from All Pro Dad

One of the best definitions of character we’ve ever heard goes something like this: “Character is what you do when no one else is looking.”

This is one reason golf is such a great life-lesson game. It’s the only professional sport where the participants call penalties on themselves.

But men of integrity value what is honest, true, noble, trustworthy, kind, and right ahead of personal gain. Once integrated into our foundational operating system, integrity ceases to be optional or “add-on”, but instead becomes a way of life.

Here are some suggestions that will help once we decide to make integrity a foundational value:

Click here to read these ten helpful ideas.

No Man Left Behind: A Model, A Method, and A Mindset

from the good folks at Man in the Mirror Ministries

No Man Left Behind is being used by more and more churches that want to make men’s discipleship a priority, and want a process to follow. We’ll look at three different perspectives on No Man Left Behind over the next three Briefings: as a model, a method and a mindset.

  • A Model — A pattern to follow that results in building something that looks like the picture.
  • A Method — How do you make it happen? The Create-Capture-Sustain process gives you a method for helping men find and follow Christ.
  • A Mindset — The all-inclusive mindset means we break out of conventional “men’s ministry” thinking, and instead begin to think about how we can reach EVERY man that interacts with our church in any way.

Click here to read the whole post.

The Need to “Go Deep” in Youth Ministry

Here’s a very brief, but also very helpful, discussion on ministering to students…

Also… I am sharing a couple of things below that I’ve posted before on this same subject (about five years ago). However, the key ideas are still very much on point.

Good Doctrine Makes Better (Teenage) Saints

It’s so vital for Christian parents to work extra hard to make sure that their kids (and even the kids of the covenant in their local church family) are raised on and saturated with biblical truths.

Today was the first day of school for our kids (we educate our children at home if you’re new to the blog). Our oldest three (which even includes our four year old) each have their own Bible curriculum that I teach them and discuss with them one-on-one each day. We may not be guaranteed that our kids will turn out like Piper and Sider suggest (see below), but kids have a much better chance when their parents disciple them…whenever and wherever the opportunities present themselves.

PS – George Barna has also been reporting these same findings for several years. In fact, the quote by Sider in the article below sounds identical to an article I read by Barna a couple of years ago. That may be Sider’s source.

Here’s a snippet from Piper’s article…

Here it is again. More evidence from surveys what the Bible makes so plain: superficial, non-doctrinal, non-serious Christians sin pretty much like the world; but more serious, more doctrinally oriented Christians lead lives that are morally distinct. Two years ago Ron Sider flagged this in his book The Scandal of the Evangelical Conscience: Why Are Christians Living Just Like the Rest of the World?
 
Now a new book by Mark Regnerus called Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers gives the same bleak picture of so-called “evangelical teenagers” who sleep around as much as unbelievers. But again the book points out that “the 16% of American teenagers who say that their faith is ‘extremely important to their lives’ are living chastely” (Gene Veith, “Sex and the Evangelical Teen,” World, August 11, 2007, p. 9).

Click here to read the whole article.

ALSO – From Barna.org

What is the connection between childhood faith and adult religious commitment? Parents and religious leaders are naturally interested in knowing if spiritual investment in young lives pays off in the long run. 

A recent study conducted by the Barna Group provides new insights into this age-old question. The survey asked adults to think back on their upbringing and to describe the frequency of their involvement in Sunday school or religious training. The Barna researchers then compared those reported early-life behaviors with the respondents’ current levels of faith activity and faith durability.

Click here to read the whole report.